Gisby's Gaming Blog

August 21, 2020

Wargames Atlantic Irish Chariot

Filed under: Ancients, Celts, Plastic Figures, Victrix, Wargames Atlantic — gisby @ 14:40

I made an Irish Chariot for my Wargames Atlantic Irish: I used a Victrix chariot, because I had one.

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The Warrior is Wargames Atlantic, and the driver is the original Victrix driver – With his knee breeches he is far more accurate as Irish than he is as a Briton or Gaul. He has a Wargames Atlantic Irish head, though. The two figures scale well together, and the head fit like it was made for him.

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The dogs running alongside are WA as well – If you do this, be careful. I have noticed the tendency is to pick it up by the dogs, and since they each have two feet on the ground, they flex alarmingly.

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The gawdawful plastic reins have been replaced with crochet cotton. The shield is painted freehand. It probably shouldn’t have a design, but people seem to expect one…

I had to enlarge the base a bit for the length of the chariot, and the width of the dogs

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The Victrix Chariot is a nice kit, but has a lot of pieces for a wargames model. It also seems a bit large, but Victrix figures are pretty big, so it fits with them. The driver is more suited to Irish or Cisalpine Gauls than Britons, but that worked out well for me.

January 9, 2020

Wargames Atlantic Afghans

I have a sample sprue from Wargame Atlantic‘s upcoming 28mm plastic Afghans, and I wasted no time in assembling and painting it. Forgive the poor photos, they were taken with my phone.

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There are 5 figures on the sprue, a mix of standing and running figures, plus one kneeling figure. To make the figures individual, there are eleven heads, with skullcaps or turbans, some with beards, some without, and wonderful facial detail.

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There are also eight sets of arms, armed with jezzails, muskets, rifles, swords, and knives, plus 4 shields, and several loose guns and scabbarded swords.

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The fit is good, and the arm pairs are marked on the sprue ( 1L, 1R) making it easy to match them up. Most of the arms can be used with any other, but there are several where they work best matched. There are essentially no mould lines.

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There are comparison pictures on their Facebook page, and the figures are scaled to work well with Perry Miniatures.

I built these at my desk in about 10 minutes, and I enjoyed doing so: The marked arm pairs and good fit made a big difference. (And I like Afghans)

I can see myself using them as Afghans, Indian Mutineers, and Baluchis, Arabs, and Zanzibaris in Darkest Africa.

Here’s a picture of the sprue from the Wargames Atlantic site. (There’s a head missing)

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April 13, 2009

Wargames Factory – Plastic Zulu War British – A Review

 

When Wargames Factory announced their intention to release a set of 1879 British, I was very excited.

First of all, because it was an indication that they were going to do Victorian subjects (pun!) but more, because it suggested that they were going to do ZULUS!

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After all, no groups will benefit more from cheap reinforcements than the various charging natives of the Colonial Era: You just need a lot of ’em to face the massive European firepower.

 

Although they were not the first set announced by WF, they were the first set actually released, so are in some ways, a learning experience for the company.

That being said, they still aren’t bad as a first attempt.

The set comprises 20 figures, with two body poses, and arms to do a mixture of firing, at ready, and loading poses. There is no Officer included.

There are also 24 heads, with 5 styles of helmeted heads, and 2 in forage caps. Helmets are separate, so bare heads are easy enough if you want them.

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When first I attempted to assemble these figures, it seemed less like I was making wargames figures than assembling Tamiya-style model figures.

The parts were tiny and fiddly, and ill-suited to my elderly ham fists.

 

I’d suggest a production line approach for efficiency:

First of all, remove, clean up, and sort the pieces.

One-by-one, attach the left arms to all the figures. (I use tube cement: It fills gaps, and allows a bit more ‘wiggle’ time)

Next, attach the right arms: The left arm will help align everything.

Attach the heads so they sight along the weapon, or look wherever you want.

Put on helmets, adjusting heads as neccessary.

This speeded things up considerably.

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The Officer

Of course I needed an Officer…

This proved amazingly easy to do. (One of the advantages of plastic)

I pared away any straps or details I didn’t want, and repositioned the ‘loading’ arms.

With a revolver and scabbarded sword from the parts box, he was done.

(The hardest part was deciding on a pose)

 

What Did I Like?

Once I came up with a method, the figures went together easily and quickly.

Ultimately, they were ‘fun’ to make.Well done faces with personality. (and yes, the helmets fit well)

Loads of variety: Between the head, arm, and body choices, no two figures need be the same.

Being plastic makes them easy to modify and assemble.

Price: They are dam’ good value.

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What Didn’t I like? (NB: What I DON’T like may well be a GOOD thing to other people)

Delicate weapons: While the figures were proportioned like wargames figures, the rifles were delicate, like traditional plastic figures. I like my rifles a bit more sturdy.

Soft detail: The detail is there, it’s just not as ‘crisp’ as it could be. (Later sets have improved on this dramatically)

I don’t like firing figures (boo hoo. Poor Tim)

Above you can see a size comparison with a Wargames Foundry Brit of the same era.

RECOMMENDED

All in all, I’d recommend this set to anyone wanting to start or increase their Zulu War forces. The figures are also suitable for service anywhere in the 1870’s and perfect for Victorian Adventure Gaming or VSF!

AVAILABLE FROM:
Wargames Factory LLC

c/o Triangle, Inc

420 Pearl Street

Malden, MA 02148

http://wargamesfactory.com/Home.htm

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