Gisby's Gaming Blog

February 5, 2017

SPACE 1889: Martians

Of course you want random personalities for 1889 games and battles, and there are plenty of choices and ranges that can be found. These are a few of my recent conversions and repaints.

martrand

An Old Glory Tarzan painted as a Wyrm Cultist, and a pair of plastic D&D figures. Replacement swords are made from wire hammered flat.martrand1

3 Forlorn Hope female Elves

martrand2

3 old GW Elves

martrand3

3 plastic D&D figures. Swords and bows are wire. The female archer has the quiver from the bird-handler in the next row.

martrand4

A plastic D&D figure, with 2 RAFM Martians with D&D heads.

January 19, 2017

New Project – Martian Flyers

Filed under: Barsoom, Pulp Gaming, Red Vector Games, Science Fiction, SPACE 1889 — gisby @ 08:51

REDvectors is an odd company, in that they seem to prefer to do custom work. Rather than have an ordinary website, they show you what they have made, and encourage you to approach them with ideas.

Mick then sits down and plans them out, and asks if that’s what you want, and if so, gives you a price.

I originally approached them because they had made a small Martian skiff, rather similar in style to the sand skiffs from Star Wars. (Which have themselves been re-purposed for many a Martian table)

blueflyer2

This is one of mine, a great little kit: Perfect fit, nice lines, a great price.

I am quite taken with them, but while they are great personal flyers, I wanted something a bit bigger. So I contacted Mick, and asked for a design 50% bigger in length and width, but with railings the same height.

This is the design he presented me with:

largeskiffy

It’s about 10 inches long, with lovely lines, and will be sweet on Barsoom or 1889 Mars. I will probably mount a small gun on the front of each.

So I have two on the way, and I am very excited. More news as it unfolds.

December 15, 2016

SPACE 1889: Martian Flyer

This is a laser-cut MDF Martian skiff from RedVectors. It’s a lovely kit, well designed, and a joy to build. I recommend it.

blueflyer1

Stylistically it’s strongly influenced by the Desert Skiffs in Star Wars. Nothing wrong with that, it’s a good look. It’s useful for Star Wars, Barsoom, SPACE 1889, or of course any other game with flying boats.

It comes with a stand as shown, but it isn’t perfectly stable, especially with a metal crew. Having the supports farther apart, a longer base, or farther back on the hull might help.

blueflyer2

The crew shown above are my Martian Marines from Forlorn Hope Games, with a RAFM pilot.

There are two options for the prow: The railing as shown, or an oval platform for a gun. I think there is also an option for the hull with layered MDF making a solid stepped hull.

blueflyer3

The  railings and other fittings are best (or most easily) painted before assembly (I couldn’t wait, and assembled it as soon as it arrived)

blueflyer4

There is no visible means of propulsion, but if you want it, a propeller is easily added.

Now if they’d only build one 50% longer.

 

September 18, 2016

Barsoom: A Few Beasts

brzbanth

A Bronze Age Miniatures Banth. Rawr!

brzcalot

Bronze Age Miniatures Calot. He’s not exactly how I pictured a Calot, but I like him.

apty1

This is a plastic D&D monster that I use as an Apt. Strictly speaking, he doesn’t look like an Apt, but whenever anyone sees him they go ‘Ah! An Apt!’

apty2

I gave him a mane so you could tell him from his harem.

August 12, 2016

Home-Grown Askaris

Years ago, I sculpted a bunch of figures for a company that shall remain nameless. They were state of the art for 1975, but it hadn’t been 1975 for many years.

I did however sculpt an Askari miniature, and kept a mould of him: Based on a Belgian Askari, he was pretty generic, so I have painted units of them in blue, khaki, and white, and he serves in many of my armies without raising eyebrows.

mybelgyellow

I recently found a TSATF unit’s worth in a box, based and primed, so I painted them as yet another bunch of Belgians.

The command figures are random figures from my Victorian spares. I think the Officer is from (long gone) ItalWars, and the NCO from Warrior Miniatures.

mybelgyellow1

My Askari is not so bad: If I could only sculpt hands, feet, faces, and bodies, he’d be great!

July 30, 2016

SPACE 1889 again

More of my Martian Mania: Martians for SPACE 1889. None of them were made to be Martians, yet somehow, they fit in well enough.

I’m starting new projects and finishing old ones. Loads of fun.

elfsera2 elfsera1

The first figures are Elfsera Elves, available as prepainted figures from eM-4 Miniatures.

elfsera3

I replaced all their weapons with swords, and gave most of them shields.

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This is an old Ral Partha Elf. He too got a new sword and shield.

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A Grenadier Elf from Doug at Moonraker Miniatures.

frelf

These are old, probably Frontier. They were sort of beat up. so I gave them new weapons and shields.

 

 

 

July 23, 2016

SPACE 1889 Skirmishers

A unit of Martian Bowmen, formerly Wood Elves from Forlorn Hope Games.

elfbow

I replaced all the bows with wire. (The bows were fine, I just usually replace weapons with wire.) The fellow second from the left has been given a sword to mark him as an officer.

elfbow2

June 3, 2016

Barsoom again

Lately I have been a bit of a Mars fanatic: SPACE 1889 and Barsoom, and sometimes the two intermixed. I have been digging out 20-year-old projects and dealing with them.

I’m also picking up some of the beautiful new stuff that’s been released since then.

mythark1

I rebased  a couple of my old homecast Green Martians, and painted one that was sitting on a shelf.

herthark

An old Heritage Green Martian got rebased.

plasbanth1

I bought a D&D plastic Displacer Beast and made a ‘Banth-alike.’ I trimmed away the tentacles, and gave it a putty mane. Not enough legs, but still more than four. It’s not as big or impressive as I would have liked.

sith1

A Reaper Miniatures ‘Bones’ Giant Wasp is now a Sith. I could have found a better angle for the picture.

brzape

I picked up a Bronze Age Miniatures White Ape. Beautiful, and he mixes with my D&D Grillah conversions perfectly.

epp2

These are not new, but fit in here well. They are conversions from D&D plastic Grillahs. I removed their tails (sculpting new bums) and switched hands around, moved limbs, etc.

I think the upper left is the stock arm pose.

epp1

There are plenty more figures in the works, and I am having a lot of fun.

September 24, 2015

Sally 4th Russian Farmhouse – A Review

Filed under: COLONIAL WARS, Pulp Gaming, Sally 4th, Victorian Adventure Gaming, WW1 — Tags: — gisby @ 20:38

This is Sally 4th‘s kit 28WW2_001 Russian Farmhouse. I have no idea how typical this building is of Russian farmhouses. (farmhice?) I picked this kit up because it looked (to me) like it wouldn’t be out-of-place as a white farmer’s home in Africa. (NB: I am not doubting it’s accuracy…. I have seen a photo of the original building, and this is what it looks like. It’s a dam’ good representation.)

Sally 4th Russian Farmhouse

It’s laser-cut from 2mm and 3mm MDF, with a patch of ‘fun fur’ for the thatching. It also comes with extensive colour-printed instructions. The fit is good, and it is well-engineered.

The building itself is a rectangle with two interior rooms. Three walls have windows, and one wall is blank. It is surrounded by a wooden walkway and an overhanging awning/roof. There is a nice-looking chimney supplied, but apparently I forgot to add it.

russianfarm6

I primed and painted all the pieces before assembly, which makes for much easier painting. Priming isn’t essential, but without it, the MDF tends to soak up paint like crazy. However the tolerances on this kit are extremely tight, so too much paint will interfere with the fit of the pieces. Be aware of how it fits together before you start painting.

The roof has four sloped pieces that are glued together, and to a good, solid frame that helps align them. The instructions suggest that there can be difficulty getting them aligned because of all the angles, but it wasn’t really difficult.

The instructions tell you to assemble the four outer walls, let them dry, then insert the inner walls and room dividers. (The walls are double-thicknesses as are the interior walls. This makes for a more substantial kit, and allows detail on both sides of the walls..)

russianfarm4

Because the tolerances are so close, I’d suggest that you assemble the interior walls then glue the outer walls around them. (And do not paint the wall surfaces that are glued together.) When dry, I filled what seams there were on the outer walls, and used a bit of the filler to add some texture to the walls themselves.

Each window has a lintel, a sill, two sides, and a shutter (open or closed) and a frame that sits inside them. Again, be careful of painting the surfaces that glue together because they may not fit easily if you are careless. Don’t get me wrong, the resulting windows look great, and all the pieces make them easy to paint. They are engineered so that they align themselves for the most part, so in spite of the number of pieces they aren’t really difficult to assemble.

The doors can also be assembled open or closed (or left unglued.) They have a handle assembly that looks like a block with two curved antennae. The instructions showed where they go, but not how. Eventually I realized that they fit into the door with the antennae pointing down, making a very convincing set of iron door handles.

The floor and walkway are a single piece, and slot into place easily. The awning and supports also fit easily and cleanly. The roof just sits on top for easy removal.

I had pictures of each end, but they are identical, so why bother?

I had never tried the ‘fun fur’ thatching before, and it was complicated by the multiple angles of the roof, I aligned and glued one  long side. When that was dry, I did the other long side. When that was dry, I folded the fabric at each end flat and slit it at the approximate centre of the wall. This left a flap on each end that overlapped the other side. I trimmed this flap where it overlapped the other, and glued them down.

Then the fabric was dry, I brushed the fur with a toothbrush, blending over the joins. I used slightly dilute white glue and brushed it all downwards.

I painted the whole house much like they did in their instructions. (It looked good, why not?)

russianfarm1

When dry, I lightly primed the thatch, then brushed various tans and greys onto it. The fur supplied was black, and I had some doubts, but it actually worked well.

While more complex than most laser-cut kits, this was easy to assemble, and a pleasure to build. The results make the extra complexity worth it. Available from Sally 4th.

July 19, 2015

Darkest Africa – More Germans

Filed under: COLONIAL WARS, Germany, Pulp Gaming, Victorian Adventure Gaming — Tags: — gisby @ 22:20

Askaris

gerskar5b

gerskar5a

This unit is based on a description of Early German Askaris in Foundry’s ‘Small Wars and Skirmishes.’ It’s made of Old Glory Egyptians painted as Africans, with a German flag. It has Egyptian Officers, as the troops hired only understood commands in Turkish, so non-German officers were needed.

The Egyptians and the Sailors below had a few of the ‘Hey Bob!’ poses, with heads looking around at odd angles, but they were easy enough to fix.

Matrosen

matrosen1900

A naval landing party. Old Glory again, Austrian sailors from the Boxer Rebellion. If there is a difference in the uniform, it’s lost to me in 25mm.

Schutztruppen

Renegade WW1 Germans in field cap, with a neck curtain added.The uniform might not be 100% correct, but it looks good enough to me. (The caps should have a small visor on the front, but I didn’t bother) They’ll also do for troops serving in Asia.

renasien

I also made a MG and crew.  The funny little tripod is made from wire and plastic card.

 schmg01 schmg02

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