Gisby's Gaming Blog

March 6, 2017

SPACE 1889: Gun Carrier

Filed under: Uncategorized — gisby @ 14:38

Martian artillery is primitive by modern standards: Heavy and unwieldy. But they have an advantage we do not have…. Liftwood. They don’t need to drag heavy guns through sand and rocky terrain, they can just pull it with no problems.

The gun carrier is a simple platform fitted with liftwood, operated by a trimsman who hovers the gun 6 or so feet above the ground. It can then be pulled by whatever creatures or troops you have handy. It won’t get bogged down or break axles, and it’s less tiring for those hauling it.

portee

Because it’s only hovering at a low altitude, and carrying a comparitively light load, it can be made using low-quality, scrap, or past-it’s-best liftwood, and the trimsman doesn’t need to be awfully skilled.

For best stability, the gun should be in a rigid frame, but they can also be hung from ropes.

Of course the same concept can be used for carrying freight, or for making smooth-riding carriages.

It’s not supposed to be a cheap flying gun-platform, or a piece of game-beating technology, more a bit of local colour.

It could also be a ‘Flight of the Phoenix’ plot point, where stranded travelers build a ‘life raft’ from bits of a crashed flyer and hope the wind will blow them to safety, barely skimming the ground.

February 5, 2017

SPACE 1889: Martians

Of course you want random personalities for 1889 games and battles, and there are plenty of choices and ranges that can be found. These are a few of my recent conversions and repaints.

martrand

An Old Glory Tarzan painted as a Wyrm Cultist, and a pair of plastic D&D figures. Replacement swords are made from wire hammered flat.martrand1

3 Forlorn Hope female Elves

martrand2

3 old GW Elves

martrand3

3 plastic D&D figures. Swords and bows are wire. The female archer has the quiver from the bird-handler in the next row.

martrand4

A plastic D&D figure, with 2 RAFM Martians with D&D heads.

December 4, 2016

SPACE 1889: Martian Marines

Filed under: Uncategorized — gisby @ 20:10

redcrew1

I’m building the crew and guns for my laser-cut skyship. I intend to build it over the Winter, but I want to have the crew ready for when it is finished.

redcrew2redcrew5

These figures are ex-Grenadier miniatures from Forlorn Hope Games. The female greatswordsman is from their Amazons range, and the crossbowmen are Dark Elves. (I have a unit of them here)

redcrew3redcrew4

The axemen/swordsmen  in surcoats are High Elves.

redcrew6

The musketeer is a Dark Elf crossbowman, converted to a musketeer.

Because the SPACE 1889 Martians were designed to resemble GW Elves, (and so were everyone else’s) the Forlorn Hope Elves add a nice variety to my Martian forces.

November 14, 2016

SPACE 1889: Heavy Crossbows

Filed under: Uncategorized — gisby @ 03:05

This is a unit of heavily-armored crossbowmen, to be used as City-State infantry. Like the Raptor Riders,  they are ex-Grenadier Dark Elves from Forlorn Hope Games.

lunaxbo1

I had originally planned to modify them into musketeers, but I did one and decided against it. He looked good, but doing another 17 was more effort than I wanted to make. They also look great as crossbowmen!

lunaxbo2

The Officer and Standard bearer are just a pair of swordsmen, converted to command. They do have command figures available, but I like these. The command figures are more flamboyant, and I wanted the unit to be all business.

I chose a crescent design for the banner, to echo the shields carried by the command figures.

lunaxbo3

The figures are great: Lots of detail to paint, and more brought out by ink washes. They will look great battling on Mars.

All in all I am very pleased with the way the unit turned out.

June 18, 2016

Mystery Pin

Filed under: Uncategorized — gisby @ 01:50

Hi. I am asking for a friend of a friend: Can anyone identify this pin?

She believes it is Polish, WW2 era, and originally had a crown, removed when the unit became part of the British forces.

Please feel free to email me, or to post any ideas in the comments section.

 

February 9, 2016

Updates to ‘The Mexican Adventure’

Filed under: Mexican Adventure, Uncategorized — gisby @ 01:17

Many years ago, I bought Preben Kannick’s ‘Military Uniforms of the World’ and was fascinated by the fact that somehow France had invaded Mexico. (I was 13) This led to a fascination with the war that increased as time went by.

Years later, I was gathering any information that I could, for use in Wargaming. Uniforms, flags, rules were all interesting, and a lot of people seemed to be doing similar research. I started putting information online (with permission) so that others could use it as well. I wrote almost nothing, it’s all the work of people far more talented than I am. The resulting website: ‘The Mexican Adventure.’

mont1866

Michael Provost is a Belgian author and illustrator, best known for his French-Language graphic novels: “Mission au Pays des Collines” and “Tacambaro” which chronicle the adventures of Remi Tambour, a young drummer in the Belgian Grenadiers. He has a blog as well.

sanluisposati1866

Michel has recently sent a bunch of illustrations of the Belgian Legion in Maximilian’s service. They have been added to his already huge selection of period uniforms.

They can be found here: Uniforms : Michel Provost

There are also new photos added to the French, Austrian, and Flag Photos pages.

 

August 2, 2015

More Random Celts

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , — gisby @ 00:01

When I was 18, I first tried my hand at sculpting. I sculpted a naked Celt, using Sculpey clay over a wire armature. (Epoxy putty did not yet exist) He was sculpted spread-eagled, and when cast, didn’t animate well, paint up well, or look particularly good. Weapons are wire, shields are cut from plastic sheet.

In spite of all that, he didn’t look worse than a lot of the stuff that was on the market.

mirl3 mirl

I wound up using him as the bodyguard to a General converted from a Lamming Viking.

The shields are decorated with waterslide decals I had made. I sold them for a while, and still find occasional sets in random boxes.

mirl2

Believe it or not, where I’m from, Old Glory are almost exotic. No retailer within an 8-hour drive carried them, and for a long time the exchange rate made ordering them very expensive. These are two of the few packs of Old Glory I own.

First of all, Celtic Naked Warriors. All weapons have been replaced with wire versions. (Swords are flattened wire). Shields come separate.

ogcelty ogcelt1

The figures are pleasing, anatomy is in general good, although as always, some poses are somewhat suspect. But enough make sense that the group looks good together.

There may be a few too many helmets in the mix, but that’s just a matter of taste.

ogcelt2a

The second pack is Bare chest, no helmet. (Their clothed Celts are sorted by helmet/no helmet and bare chest/tunic so you can tailor the mix to your own taste. Command is sold separately) All the comments about the above pack apply to this pack as well.

ogcelt2 ogcelt1a

Overall, the Old Glory Celts are good-looking sets, I wouldn’t mind having more of them.

They also have released more Celts in their Carthaginian range, with weapon hands that peg onto the wrists, and they look to be even better figures. (I’ve only seen photos)

May 31, 2015

Cowtown Chronicle on Facebook

Filed under: Uncategorized — gisby @ 22:29

As many of you will know, I edit the Combat Zone Chronicles. A part of the CoZoChron is the Cowtown Chronicles, where I build Old West buildings using various techniques, and also build and review Old West building kits.

kilroy5

In an effort to get update information out there more easily, I have made a Facebook page where I will showcase old articles and announce new ones. Cowtown Chronicle on FB. Please have a look, and let me know what you think!

tobacc6

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.