Gisby's Gaming Blog

August 22, 2022

VBCW: Burford-Kegresse Half Track

When I saw the Burford-Kegresse in a photo of manouevers in the 1920’s it was the first I had ever heard of it. It looked ungainly and awful, so I knew I needed it for my VBCW armies. I bought an STL file, and obtained permission to have it printed by a third party. (Paint and Glue Miniatures)

In real life, there was only a small batch made, and found wanting, they were scrapped in 1929. (They worked well enough, but the tracks, being a rubber/canvas composite, were prone to failing) I had thought they would just be a colourful piece of transport – imagine my surprise when I found they each had two (perhaps overscale) HMGs on a 360 degree mount. Suddenly they are a real threat.

They were also apparently difficult to print. Garry at Paint & Glue eventually printed the guns and mount separately in resin (I had ordered the cheaper plastic) to overcome the difficulties, and even threw in one of the ‘incomplete’ prints in case I wanted to use it as a wreck. It was complete enough that I was able to make a third half track.

But Garry went above and beyond on this commission.

The drivers and passengers are homemade, using blue stuff to cast putty bodies. The heads are Woodbine Designs WW1 heads, because all you really see of the drivers is their heads.

The gunners are Wargames Atlantic WW1 German officers, also with Woodbine heads. I had to narrow their shoulders to fit in the mounts, and fix the guns in place so I could remove the swivels (to widen the space for the gunners) The gunners are standing loose, held in place by the gun ring. The guns can rotate, and so can the gunners.

August 8, 2022

More Barsoom Beasts

Filed under: 3D Printing, Barsoom, Classic Miniatures, Wargames Atlantic — gisby @ 19:35

The creatures of Barsoom are fierce and terrifying, and have been copied in many lesser works of fiction. They can be found in the wilderness, or deep under cities, both inhabited and abandoned. They will provide a challenge to adventurers, and a change from the usual sword duels.

The Banth is a fierce predator, referred to as a ‘Martian Lion’ it tracks it’s prey tirelessly on it’s ten strong legs, and is feared by both man and beast.

This is the Banth first made by Heritage, 45 years ago, and recently made available again through Classic Miniatures.

It’s a single piece casting, and it has not aged particularly well. It seems a bit crude compared to other offerings, and it’s not the fault of the new moulds. (Because of better metal they are crisper than the originals) But remember, when this miniature was released, it was world-class sculpting.

The face has a definite Asian look, with curling whiskers like a Fu dog.

They were also sculpting before there was epoxy putty

Even the Green Warriors were wary of the White Apes of Barsoom. Gigantic in size, they had six limbs and an aggressive nature.

This figure is a 3D printed White Ape. (three views) It matches well in size with the Bronze Age apes and the D&D plastic Grillahs, although its head seems to be a bit smaller in proportion.

The pose is dynamic, and could be modified easily with a saw and glue. There are apparently three poses in the file, and this is just one.

There are Giant Spiders in the Valley Hohr, and deep in the tunnels under many cities – Who knows where else they may be found?

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These are the Wargames Atlantic Giant Spiders, and they are horrifying in aspect but fun to assemble. They come 12 in a box, perfect if you want to use them as mounts for depraved cultists from a lost city. There are also smaller spiders (not the ones under the big guys in the photos) and web-wrapped victims included as well.

The set includes mechanical arms and SF weapons for those of a more SF and less VSF bent. (Although they would be great for Barsoom, where weird science was the norm.)

February 20, 2022

Barsoom: Giant Spiders of the Valley Hohr

Filed under: Barsoom, Fantasy, Plastic Figures, Wargames Atlantic — gisby @ 03:08

There are Giant Spiders in the Valley Hohr, and deep in the tunnels under many cities – Who knows where else they may be found?

If you want to run a wilderness adventure, or a dungeon crawl in the tunnels beneath a city, these creatures will provide a terrifying challenge to your heroes.

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These are the Wargames Atlantic Giant Spiders, and they are horrifying in aspect but fun to assemble. They come 12 in a box, perfect if you want to use them as mounts for depraved cultists from a lost city.

There are also smaller spiders (not the ones under the big guys in the photos) and web-wrapped victims included.

The set includes mechanical arms and SF weapons for those of a more SF and less VSF bent. (Although they would be great for Barsoom, where weird science was the norm.)

Even if you aren’t scared of spiders, they are still pretty creepy, and a bunch of them on the table will give your players the squirms.

February 17, 2022

SPACE 1889: Lizard Men of Venus

I was very excited when Wargames Atlantic released their Lizard Men. They had a great mix of weapons, ideal for native forces on Venus. They also released WW1 Germans, providing ideal allies/enemies for the lizard men.

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The figures themselves are top-notch, with separate heads (both lizard and chameleon-like) arms, and tails, allowing great variation in pose. There are also spears, native muskets, and human muskets. (and futuristic SF guns for you futuristic SF types) No bases or shields are supplied.

I used an officer from the WW1 German set, with a skirt added to his hat to make a tropical uniform. With him are a native scout, and a standard bearer. The shields are plastic fantasy shields from my parts box.

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As you can see, the scout has a slung shield (which makes him look like he’s wearing a turtle costume) and a sword on his back. Unlike all the others, he is equipped with a human-made musket, either bought, traded for, or stolen.

The spear unit can serve as native auxiliaries or as hostile locals. The spears are made from floral wire, with a thread wrap, painted to have copper blades.

The leaders have head spines, all others have smooth heads.

20 aggressive warriors, ready to get stuck-in with their spears.

There is also a musket unit. They are all armed with native-made guns so can serve as allies or enemies of the Germans.

There are 20 in total, including the spiky-headed leader. Their striped skin makes them hard to spot when they set an ambush.

The red stripe on their faces was intended to be war paint rather than body markings, and was supposed to show that they are askaris rather than wild lizards.

I also built a German walker, from a Star Wars ‘Happy Meal’ toy. I cut away a turret, made a cockpit, and put a driver in. It has no weapons or discernable function.

February 16, 2022

VBCW Birch Gun

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The Birch Gun was the first practical British self-propelled artillery gun, built at the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich in 1925. The Birch gun comprised a Vickers Medium Mark II tank chassis originally fitted with a QF 18-pounder (83.8 mm) gun. The gun had a 360 degree traverse, and could elevate 90 degrees, making it useable as an anti-aircraft gun. Although a design before its time, it was not adopted for use, and only three were built.

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Once I learned of the Birch Gun, I decided I must have one. I looked at various 3D printers, and they seemed to want more for a 1/56 model than a real Birch Gun would have cost.

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But Wargaming3D had a 1/100 (15mm) STL file for a reasonable price, so I bought it and asked a friend to print it for me at 178%, as this SHOULD scale it up to 1/56.

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The rivet detail isn’t as sharp as it could be, but that’s all right, as I paint my VBCW armour as if it was 1930’s Dinky Toys. The less-crisp detail actually improves the look.

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The gun crew are made from Wargames Atlantic kneeling WW1 German infantry (They will be releasing WW1 British very soon) They have been given Service Cap heads from Gripping Beast’s Woodbine Designs range. They are removable, and the gun rotates. (It does not elevate)

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The driver is a putty casting made with blue-stuff moulds. He started as a Reiver Castings driver, copied in putty. This was then filed and trimmed to fit: Because the driver’s position is very narrow, he doesn’t actually have a left arm. He too has a Woodbine head.

All in all, I am very pleased with the way the vehicle turned out, I am developing a fondness for 3D printed tanks.

October 26, 2020

VBCW: Woodbine Indian Infantry

Filed under: Crucible Crush, VBCW, Wargames Atlantic, Woodbine Design, WW1 — gisby @ 18:04

I was building a trio of Birch Guns, for which I needed a number of Woodbine Designs WW1British heads. Since I was putting an order together, I decided to add a unit of Indian infantry to my VBCW forces.

These are from their WW1 Indian Infantry range. I specified ‘All advancing or charging figures’ and they were kind enough to provide a great selection. They have separate heads, and I chose Hindu rather than Sikh heads.

The officer is a Woodbine British officer. I had a few spares, so I just slotted one in.

Thinking about it, I already have plenty of Indian troops in my WW1 and Colonial forces, so there was no real need to get more. But I am very glad I did.

The Woodbine Indians were a joy to build and paint, I actually felt like they were painting themselves. The detail is good, and well-defined without being coarse or overdone.

Here’s a comparison with Great War – Woodbine – Wargames Atlantic – Crucible Crush.

All in all, lovely fellows, and highly recommended.

August 21, 2020

Wargames Atlantic Irish Chariot

Filed under: Ancients, Celts, Plastic Figures, Victrix, Wargames Atlantic — gisby @ 14:40

I made an Irish Chariot for my Wargames Atlantic Irish: I used a Victrix chariot, because I had one.

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The Warrior is Wargames Atlantic, and the driver is the original Victrix driver – With his knee breeches he is far more accurate as Irish than he is as a Briton or Gaul. He has a Wargames Atlantic Irish head, though. The two figures scale well together, and the head fit like it was made for him.

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The dogs running alongside are WA as well – If you do this, be careful. I have noticed the tendency is to pick it up by the dogs, and since they each have two feet on the ground, they flex alarmingly.

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The gawdawful plastic reins have been replaced with crochet cotton. The shield is painted freehand. It probably shouldn’t have a design, but people seem to expect one…

I had to enlarge the base a bit for the length of the chariot, and the width of the dogs

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The Victrix Chariot is a nice kit, but has a lot of pieces for a wargames model. It also seems a bit large, but Victrix figures are pretty big, so it fits with them. The driver is more suited to Irish or Cisalpine Gauls than Britons, but that worked out well for me.

January 9, 2020

Wargames Atlantic Afghans

I have a sample sprue from Wargame Atlantic‘s upcoming 28mm plastic Afghans, and I wasted no time in assembling and painting it. Forgive the poor photos, they were taken with my phone.

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There are 5 figures on the sprue, a mix of standing and running figures, plus one kneeling figure. To make the figures individual, there are eleven heads, with skullcaps or turbans, some with beards, some without, and wonderful facial detail.

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There are also eight sets of arms, armed with jezzails, muskets, rifles, swords, and knives, plus 4 shields, and several loose guns and scabbarded swords.

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The fit is good, and the arm pairs are marked on the sprue ( 1L, 1R) making it easy to match them up. Most of the arms can be used with any other, but there are several where they work best matched. There are essentially no mould lines.

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There are comparison pictures on their Facebook page, and the figures are scaled to work well with Perry Miniatures.

I built these at my desk in about 10 minutes, and I enjoyed doing so: The marked arm pairs and good fit made a big difference. (And I like Afghans)

I can see myself using them as Afghans, Indian Mutineers, and Baluchis, Arabs, and Zanzibaris in Darkest Africa.

Here’s a picture of the sprue from the Wargames Atlantic site. (There’s a head missing)

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